Best Views in the UK

By Mark Wright

If you’re looking for a little inspiration for your next walking holiday, then help is at hand. Here we showcase what we believe are ten of the very best views in the UK. The wonderful thing about them is they can all be enjoyed on one of our walking holidays. We’re sure you’ll agree, they’re all magnificent. The question is – which will you visit first?

Buachaille Etive Mòr – West Highland Way

Buachaille Etive Mòr is one of the most recognisable mountains in Scotland. Once seen, the image will live long in the memory of the walker. It’s pyramid like silhouette is best viewed from the iconic Kingshouse Hotel, a favourite stopover on the West Highland Way.

Learn more about the West Highland Way

Durdle Door – Dorset Coast Path

One of Dorset’s most photographed and iconic landmarks is Durdle Door. Standing about 200 feet above sea level the natural limestone arch is part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site.

Learn more about the Dorset Coast Path

Loch Ness – Great Glen Way

At 23 miles long, Loch Ness is deeper than the North Sea and holds more water than all the lakes in England and Wales put together, and if you’re a believer, is home to the Loch Ness Monster, Nessie. The views are superb along the entire length of the loch, but especially so when combined with Urquhart Castle near the village of Drumnadrochit.

Learn more about the Great Glen Way

Ribblehead Viaduct – Dales Way

If you’re lucky enough to be spending the evening at Ribblehead while walking the Dales Way, then take a short stroll to marvel at the 24 span Ribblehead Viaduct, also known as the Batty Moss Viaduct. The viaduct is a much loved feature of the picturesque Carlisle to Settle train line.

Learn more about the Dales Way

Roseberry Topping – Cleveland Way

At 1,049 feet (320 m), Roseberry Topping is quite literally one of the highlights on Cleveland Way. The views from the summit are magnificent. On a clear day it’s possible to see the Pennines, some 40 to 50 miles away.

Learn more about the Cleveland Way

Seven Sisters – South Downs Way

The Seven Sisters chalk cliffs are one of the most eagerly awaited sections of the South Downs Way. If you don’t have time to walk the whole way you can a enjoy a two day circular walk crossing the Seven Sisters and passing the famous Long Man of Wilmington, Britain’s largest chalk figure.

Learn more about the South Downs Way

Sycamore Gap – Hadrian’s Wall

Is there a more photographed tree in the UK? The Sycamore Gap Tree or Robin Hood Tree stands next to Hadrian’s Wall near Crag Lough in Northumberland. The tree, recognisable from the film Robin Hood Prince of Thieves won the 2016 England Tree of the Year award.

Learn more about Hadrian’s Wall

The Green Bridge of Wales – Pembrokeshire Coast Path

One of the most impressive sights on the Pembrokeshire Coast Path is The Green Bridge of Wales, a natural arch formed from Carboniferous Limestone. The arch formed as the sea wore away the rock beneath.

Learn more about the Pembrokeshire Coast Path

The Needles – Isle of Wight Coastal Path

The Needles are a series of chalk stacks off the western coast of the Isle of Wight. Alongside them stands the Needles lighthouse, built in 1859. The Needles are viewed here from Headen Warren, however if you want a closer look you can take a boat trip from the jetty for a spectacular tour around the rocks and lighthouse.

Learn more about the Isle of Wight Coastal Path

Wasdale – Inn Way to the Lake District

Wasdale is home to England’s deepest lake, Wastwater and England’s highest mountain, Scafell Pike. Wasdale is considered to be the home of British rock climbing. Two of our long distance routes will to take you here, the Inn Way to the Lake District which passes by forty traditional Inns and the Tour of the Lake District.

Learn more about the Inn Way to the Lake District and the Tour of the Lake District  


For more information on any of the holidays highlighted here email us info@mickledore.co.uk. or call us on 017687 72335 to speak to one of our walking holiday experts.