Walking Holidays in Northern England

Northern England really does have something for everyone. Choose from a walking holiday steeped in Roman history set against a beautiful backdrop of rolling hills or visit castles and fishing villages as you follow dramatic coastlines. If it is mountains and moorland, valleys and lakes you are looking for, you can explore the stunning landscape of the Yorkshire Dales, the North York Moors and the Lake District. You can embark on a journey across England by walking along the Hadrian's Wall Path or walk in the footsteps of Alfred Wainwright to complete the classic long distance route of the Coast to Coast.

The Cleveland Way could be described as two walking holidays in one as the route winds its way through two very different landscapes, from the rugged and peaceful moorland of the North York Moors to the breathtaking coastline that overlooks the North Sea. The Northumberland Coast Path is a delightful trail dotted with castles, sweeping sandy beaches and remote islands. This is a walking holiday steeped in historical charm but is also perfect for bird and wildlife enthusiasts alike. St Oswald's Way is another wonderful mix of coastal walking that ends with rolling countryside and quiet moorland, starting on the isolated island of Lindisfarne and ending at Hadrian's Wall.

Embarking on a walk along the Hadrian's Wall path allows you to become immersed in the history of the Roman Empire as you encounter forts, milecastles, historical remains and a very well preserved section of the wall. This World Heritage Site is set against a backdrop of moorland and rolling agricultural landscape providing wonderful panoramic views and together with accommodation that  is charming, comfortable and full of character, makes a walk along Hadrian's Wall a truly memorable holiday.

The Coast to Coast is a classic walking holiday that is a challenging but rewarding experience and takes you on a journey through a remarkable variety of landscape, as you pass through three National Parks. The Dales Way will lead you alongside the flowing waters of the  Rivers Wharfe and Dee as it meanders through limestone country to end under the magnificent backdrop of the Lake District mountains. If you embark on the Lady Anne's Way scenic villages, historical castles and cobbled streets are waiting to be explored as you walk through the delightful Eden Valley and the Yorkshire Dales.

The Cleveland Way stretches for over 100 miles from Helmsley on the southern edge of the North York Moors National Park, to Filey on the east coast.

Sandsend

The Cleveland Way is both an interesting and a beautiful path, established in 1969. It stretches for over 100 miles from Helmsley, on the southern edge of the North York Moors National Park, to Filey on the east coast.

The way passes through two very distinct types of landscape; from Helmsley to Saltburn-by-the-Sea. It traverses classic moorland scenery; through forests and along escarpments, giving the walker panoramic views over the Cleveland Hills and the rest of the National Park. The other half of the route, from Saltburn-by-the-Sea to Filey, follows a dramatic coastline and runs along the top of some of the highest sea cliffs in the country.

Length

6 - 12 nights

Full Route Length

108 miles / 176 km

Shortest Break Length

54 miles / 86 km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

Brilliant panoramas over the surrounding countryside as you traverse the edge of the North York Moors.

Characterful fishing villages set in deep coves dotted along the coast.

Dramatic cliff top walking with views over the North Sea.

Historic Whitby, home of Captain Cook, with its Abbey and harbour.

Beautiful beaches.

The classic traverse of the north of England from the cliffs of St. Bees Head on the Irish Sea, to the fishing village of Robin Hood’s Bay on the North Sea Coast. Passing through the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors.

Buttermer&crummock

The Coast to Coast walk was dreamt up by Alfred Wainwright, the famous fell walker and guidebook writer, in 1973. Since then the Coast to Coast Path has become one of England’s classic long distance walks. It covers 190 miles, from the sea cliffs of St Bees on the Irish Sea, to the fishing village of Robin Hood’s Bay on the North Sea. The quality and variety of this walk is recognised internationally, with walkers travelling from around the globe to complete the walk.

As the route traverses the country, the two week journey passes through three National Parks and across a real cross-section of England’s best landscapes. It begins in the Lake District, taking in deep sided valleys, lake shores and remote mountain passes.

Next is the limestone country of the Yorkshire Dales, famous for its intricate field patterns and dry stone walls. The old market town of Richmond marks the end of the Dales, before the path crosses the Vale of York and rises over the rolling moorland hills of the North York Moors.

Length

6 - 18 nights

Full Route Length

190 miles / 303 km

Shortest Break Length

82 miles / 131 km

Average Grade

Challenging

Why do this walk?

Walk through the best mountain and moorland scenery in England.

Challenging walking though the Lake District fells.

Enjoy the great variety of scenery as you pass through 3 National Parks.

Stay in some beautiful villages, hamlets and market towns.

Probably the best long distance path in the country!

The Dales Way starts in the market town of Ilkley in West Yorkshire. It takes a route through the valleys and fell sides of the Yorkshire Dales to Bowness, on the shores of Lake Windermere in the Lake District.

Walking the Dales Way

The Dales Way crosses through the Yorkshire Dales from east to west, spending much of its time on the riverside paths bordering the Rivers Wharfe and Dee. The path begins in Ilkley, a market town at the eastern edge of the Dales and takes a route through Wharfedale and Dentdale, before crossing into the foothills of the Lake District to finish on the shores of Lake Windermere, England’s largest lake, in the Lake District.

This is primarily a riverside walk threaded between market towns and ancient limestone village hamlets. In between, the route takes in shorter sections of moors, fell sides and limestone pavement to keep the route interesting.

The Yorkshire Dales is an internationally renowned National Park, with a characteristic landscape of limestone dry stone walls and isolated field barns with small villages and hamlets dotted through the steep sided valleys.

Length

4 - 9 nights

Full Route Length

81 miles / 130 km

Shortest Break Length

21 miles / 34 km

Average Grade

Easy to Moderate

Why do this walk?

Charming historic limestone villages dotted along the River Wharfe.

Pleasant, not too strenuous, walking in the distinctive Yorkshire Dales landscape - you've got time to relax, soak up the peaceful ambience, and enjoy the views.

Skirts the beautiful Howgill Fells, one of the quietest corners of Cumbria.

This holiday follows the recently established Hadrian’s Wall Trail. A National Trail following the Roman wall as it crosses the north of England from Wallsend, near Newcastle, to the Solway Firth beyond Carlisle.

Walking on Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian’s Wall Path was opened in 2002 and proved an immediate success with walkers from both the UK and abroad.
The route follows the line of Hadrian’s Wall which was constructed by Roman emperor Hadrianus between AD120 and AD128 to protect the northern extreme of the Roman Empire.
It crosses the country from coast to coast – from Wallsend, near Newcastle, through the rolling border countryside of Northumberland, continuing on to the historic city of Carlisle and finally to the flat plains of the Solway Coast.
At every mile along the Wall there is a milecastle with two watchtowers in-between. Although parts of the wall have been plundered for local houses, the central section is very well preserved, as well as the various forts and milecastles on the way.

Length

4 - 11 nights

Full Route Length

82 miles / 132 km

Shortest Break Length

24 miles / 38 km

Average Grade

Easy to Moderate

Why do this walk?

Follow the most extensive Roman remains in the world from Coast to Coast.

Dramatic scenery in the central section.

An easy to follow trail with great accommodation.

Short breaks available over the best preserved section.

A 52 mile circular route through Wensleydale and Swaledale in the beautiful Yorkshire Dales, this route journeys over high fells,through picturesque villages, over heather covered moorland and into the valleys with their distinctive dry stone walls.

Barns in Swaledale

The Herriot Way is a 52 mile circular route running through some of the most beautiful scenery in the Yorkshire Dales.

It is based upon a walk taken by the well-known veterinarian and writer James Herriot. It visits his favourite locations and places where he lived and worked for many years, made famous in his books “James Herriot’s Yorkshire” and “All Creatures Great and Small”. It starts and ends in Aysgarth in the heart of Wensleydale, famous for its cheese as well as its waterfalls, and passes through fabulous Swaledale with its wildflower meadows and landscape of limestone dry stone walls and barns.

The path leads you through valleys, over high fells and heather-clad moorland visiting traditional villages and the market town of Hawes along the way.

Length

5 nights

Full Route Length

52 miles/ 83km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

See the stunning parts of the Yorkshire Dales described by James Herriot in his books ‘All Creatures Great and Small’ and ‘James Herriot’s Yorkshire.’

Visit Hardraw Force, the highest single-drop waterfall in England, and Aysgarth Falls, the impressive triple-drop waterfall.

Explore beautiful Dales villages and towns such as Thwaite, Reeth, Askrigg and Hawes.

Visit the home of Wensleydale Cheese in the market town of Hawes.

 

Following in the footsteps of Lady Anne Clifford, this walk travels 100 miles, castle to castle, from Skipton in North Yorkshire to Penrith in Cumbria. Exploring the stunning valleys and rugged moorlands of the Yorkshire Dales, it finishes in the idyllic Vale of Eden.

On Lady Anne's Way at Mallerstang

Lady Anne’s Way is a classic long distance walk extending for 100 miles from the rugged limestone countryside of the Yorkshire Dales, to the unspoilt villages of the Eden Valley. The trail was conceived as a tribute to Lady Anne Clifford, who devoted her life to the restoration of her castles, churches and monuments along this route in the 17th Century. From Skipton Castle in North Yorkshire the path runs north to the ruins of Brougham Castle on the outskirts of Penrith.

The Way takes in sections of the Dales Way in Wharfdale and the ancient green lane known as Lady Anne’s Highway along Mallerstang, visiting Lady Anne’s historically significant buildings along the route. The varied nature of this trail makes it appealing to both seasoned walkers and those seeking their first experience of a long distance hike. Starting with easy walking along the banks of the river Wharfe the route then takes a high path over the fells from Wensleydale into Mallerstang with its wild and dramatic scenery. Entering the Eden Valley the trail from Kirkby Stephen to Appleby is along soft flowing rivers leading through scenic villages on the way to Penrith.

Length

6 - 10 nights

Full Route Length

100 miles / 161 km

Shortest Break Length

50 miles / 80 km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

Walk through the wild and dramatic valleys of Wensleydale and Mallerstang in the Yorkshire Dales.

Enjoy the scenic villages and lush pastures of the Eden Valley.

Visit historically significant buildings along the way as the route travels between the castles of Skipton and Brougham.

The Northumberland Coast Path is best known for its sweeping beaches, imposing castles, rolling dunes, high rocky cliffs and isolated islands.

Northumberland Coast Path Veiws of Bamburgh Castle

The Northumberland Coast is best known for its sweeping beaches, imposing castles, rolling dunes, high rocky cliffs and isolated islands. Amidst this striking landscape is the evidence of an area steeped in history, covering 7000 years of human activity. A host of conservation sites, including two National Nature Reserves testify to the great variety of wildlife and habitats also found on the coast.

The 64miles / 103km route follows the coast in most places with an inland detour between Belford and Holy Island. Most of the paths are public rights of way (footpaths and bridleways), but in some places beaches, minor roads, tracks and permissive paths are used. The route is generally level with very few climbs.

Length

5 - 7 nights

Full Route Length

64 miles / 102 km

Shortest Break Length

4 days / 5 nights

Average Grade

Easy to Moderate

Why do this walk?

A string of dramatic castles along the coast punctuate your walk.

The serene beauty of the wide open bays of Northumbrian beaches are reason enough themselves!

Take an extra day to cross the tidal causeway to Holy Island with Lindisfarne Castle and Priory.

This is an easy, mainly flat walk on generally good paths - no need to over exert yourself!

This walking holiday covers a distance of 97 miles. The St Oswald’s Way starts on the historic island of Lindisfarne and follows the spectacular Northumberland coastline to Warkworth before heading inland and finishing at the Hadrian’s Wall.

St Oswald's Way Views - Dunstanburgh Castle

This walking holiday traces the footsteps of St Oswald, the Anglo Saxon King who played a significant role in the introduction of Christianity to England. Covering a distance of 97 miles, St Oswald’s Way starts on the historic island of Lindisfarne. It follows the spectacular Northumberland coastline to Warkworth before heading inland along the beautiful River Coquet to the ancient town of Rothbury. From there it heads south over heather-clad moors, through forest and rolling countryside, finishing at the World Heritage Site of Hadrian’s Wall.

St Oswald’s Way has everything: stunning coastal walking, wild expansive moorland, spectacular geology, quiet fishing villages and picturesque market towns. This walking holiday takes you through centuries of history, passing Neolithic rock art, Iron Age forts, Roman sites, medieval castles, imposing eighteenth century limekilns, and coastal defences from World War Two.

It is a straightforward walk, with its highest point at just over 300m (990ft). With a rich variety of birdlife, seals and dolphins, red squirrels, rare butterflies and plants, this walking holiday is the perfect one to choose if you want a taste of all the best bits of England’s best kept secret, Northumberland.

Length

6 - 9 days

Full Route Length

97 miles

Shortest Break Length

37 miles

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

A great route linking the Northumberland Coast with Hadrian's Wall, through the quiet Northumberland countryside.

Start on Holy Island, with its castle, ruined priory, and seal colony.

Finish with a visit to Chesters Fort on Hadrian's Wall.

Follow the Northumberland coast along sweeping beaches linking old fishing villages, and dotted with dramatic castles.

Lots of history - mediaeval castles, prehistoric settlements, and the Roman Wall.

Client Feedback

We have no hesitation in recommending Mickledore.The B&Bs we arrived at the end of each day are such a treat! Charming, welcoming and comfortable! Nothing went wrong during our trip – however we were confident and reassured that it would be easy to contact Mickledore to sort anything out if needs be. Thank you! A great time in beautiful Cumbria and Yorkshire.

Coast to Coast, September 2016
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The Coast to Coast was a special event for me. Thanks again!

Coast to Coast, June 2016
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First rate! Terrific value for money!

Lady Anne’s Way, July 2016
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