Ireland

In the south west corner of Ireland, along a stretch of the wild Atlantic coast, we offer the Dingle Way and the Kerry Way. Located on neighbouring peninsulas separated by Dingle Bay, these are two of Ireland’s most popular long distance waymarked trails.

The Dingle Way is rich with archaeological and cultural heritage and is renowned for its dramatic scenery and fascinating geology. The Slieve Mish Mountains and Brandon Mountain combine with miles of beautiful expansive sands, quiet country lanes, woodlands and wetlands to deliver a hugely varied and rewarding walking experience.

Set on the Inveragh Peninsula the Kerry Way is a walker’s version of the famous Ring of Kerry and travels through some of Ireland’s most spectacular landscapes. From the dense woodland of Killarney National Park, the centuries-old tracks beneath MacGillycuddy’s Reeks, home to the country’s highest mountain, to the wonderful coastal panoramas in the south of the peninsula, this is an incredible journey of contrasts.

The western Dingle Peninsula and part of the Inveragh Peninsula are designated as Gaeltacht, a place where the Irish language is spoken and Irish culture is honoured.

Whichever of our first two Ireland holidays you choose, you are guaranteed a warm welcome and good craic wherever you go.

A challenging circuit of the Dingle Peninsula on Ireland’s wild Atlantic coast with spectacular scenery at every turn.

The Dingle Way is one of Ireland’s most popular long distance trails and it’s easy to see why. On your 116 mile circuit of the Dingle Peninsula you’ll discover a landscape rich with archaeological and cultural heritage. There are numerous well-preserved examples of standing stones, dolmens, ring forts, clocháns and perhaps the most intriguing of all, Ogham, an ancient alphabet cut along the flat edges of stones. The western Dingle Peninsula is part of the Gaeltacht, a place where the Irish language is spoken and Irish culture is honoured, notably in dance, song and crafts.

Located on Ireland’s wild Atlantic coast the Dingle Way is renowned for its dramatic and atmospheric scenery. Prepare yourself for awe-inspiring landscapes as you traverse the lower slopes of the Slieve Mish Mountains, climb the shoulder of Mount Eagle and cross the flanks of Brandon Mountain. Off the mountains there are miles of beautiful expansive sands to be enjoyed. Add to this, quiet country lanes, picturesque farm tracks, woodlands and wetlands, and you have a hugely varied and rewarding walking experience.

The Dingle Peninsula is home to a variety of habitats and wildlife. Bell heather and the pink-flowering ling carpet the moors. Skylarks, kestrels and peregrine falcons fly overhead. Hedgerows are coloured with yellow primroses, pink and white wild dog rose and purple foxgloves. Oyster catchers, ringed plovers and redshanks can be found on wetlands and off the coast look for seals and the occasional dolphin.

The Peninsula has a fascinating geology and there are stunning rock formations along much of the coastline. Separated from the peninsula by a narrow strip of water are the Blasket Islands. Abandoned in the early 1950’s the islands lie on the westernmost edge of Europe. Consider factoring in a rest day at Dingle or Dunquin, and weather permitting, take a boat trip to spend time exploring the abandoned village and outlying buildings.

At the heart of your Dingle Way holiday is hospitality. From the quiet charm of rural guesthouses to lively inns filled with the sound of traditional music and laughter, you are guaranteed a warm welcome and good craic wherever you go.

Length

5 - 9 nights

Full Route Length

116 miles / 187 km

Shortest Break Length

59 miles / 95 km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

Experience the adventure of one of Ireland’s most popular long distance walks.

Discover a landscape rich with archaeological heritage and marvel at the many stone circles, standing stones and dolmens.

Walk over wild moorland on the lower slopes of the Slieve Mish mountains and traverse the northern shoulder of Brandon Mountain.

Learn about the Gaeltacht, where Irish language is spoken and Irish culture is honoured.

Enjoy expansive beach walking between Brandon and Tralee Bays and delight in the beautiful white ribbon of Inch Strand.

Follow a dramatic coastline shaped with awe inspiring geology.

Enjoy the machair and an abundance of colourful wildflowers.

Listen live to traditional music and enjoy delicious food and drink.

A hugely rewarding circuit of the Inveragh Peninsula on a walker’s version of the famous Ring of Kerry.

The Kerry Way is one of Ireland’s longest and oldest waymarked walking trails. With a pedigree stretching back forty years, this walker’s version of the Ring of Kerry has established itself as firm favourite with seasoned walkers. On your 123 mile circuit of the Inveragh Peninsula you’ll walk through what are undoubtedly some of Ireland’s most spectacular landscapes.

Located on Ireland’s southwest corner the Kerry Way delivers an incredibly varied walking experience. The awe-inspiring views across Lough Leane and Muckross Lake, once seen, will never be forgotten. Nor will the sight of Torc Falls nestled in the dense woodland of Killarney National Park, Ireland’s oldest protected wilderness. In the north of the peninsula you’ll walk along centuries-old tracks passing beneath the magnificent MacGillycuddy’s Reeks, home to the country’s highest mountain, Carrauntoohil. Peaceful glens with their delightful sparkling loughs enhance the wild, natural beauty of the area further still. The south coast of the peninsula is different again with its wonderful coastal panoramas of turquoise waters, golden sands, rocky headlands and picturesque islets.

The Inveragh Peninsula is home to a variety of habitats and wildlife. In the uplands purple moor-grass is widespread and bog cotton flourishes on watery ground. Insect eating sundews and the purple-flowering greater butterwort are on display also. Overhead, look out for kestrels, peregrine falcons and if you are lucky, a white-tailed eagle. Sessile oak, holly and silver birch woodlands give shelter to white wood anemone and bluebells. On coastal trails keep an eye out for the black, fish-eating, cormorant. In spring and summer blackthorn, hawthorn, clematis and honeysuckle colour the hedgerows.

Heritage features heavily too as part of the peninsula is designated as Gaeltacht, a place where the Irish language is spoken and Irish culture is honoured. Wherever you go on your Kerry Way journey you are assured of a warm, Irish welcome.

Length

4 - 10 nights

Full Route Length

123 miles / 198 km

Shortest Break Length

45 miles / 73 km

Average Grade

Moderate to Challenging

Why do this walk?

Experience the adventure of one of Ireland’s longest waymarked trails.

Discover the delights of the Inveragh Peninsula on a walker’s version of the Ring of Kerry.

Walk through some of Ireland’s most spectacular mountain landscapes.

Savour views of MacGillycuddy’s Reeks, including Ireland’s highest peak, Carrauntoohil.

Enjoy the many magnificent coastal panoramas and delight in the beautiful sheltered beaches and inshore islets.

Marvel at the stunning views across Loch Leane and Muckross Lake.

Enjoy charming woodlands and experience Torc Waterfall in Killarney National Park.

Cross over high passes following centuries-old tracks.

Enjoy a warm Irish welcome wherever you go.