Walking Holidays in Scotland

Scotland is a true walker's paradise, with everything from gentle lowlands and coastal paths to the more rugged mountains of the Highlands. Walking holidays in Scotland offer something for everyone. From the quiet countryside of the Scottish Borders to the dramatic scenery of the Highlands, our hiking tours include the best that Scotland has to offer.

For those that like a challenge, tackle the classic West Highland Way joining the Scottish lowlands with the West Highlands, with its rugged landscape and magnificent mountain views. Or experience the gentler side of walking in Scotland on one of our easier walking holidays such as the Great Glen Way, ideal for those who want to see Scotland at its best, but with a little less effort.The route follows the classic Caledonian Canal and heads along the shores of the famous Loch Ness. For a longer walking holiday join these two stunning walks together for a true Scottish experience.

The Rob Roy Way takes you on a journey through the Southern Highlands on a mixture of forest tracks, old railway lines and up into the hills. Along the way you will be rewarded with tumbling waterfalls, lochs and breathtaking mountain views. The Speyside Way heads inland from the stunning Moray coast, into the magical Spey Valley and through whisky country to finish in the foothills of the magnificent Cairngorm mountains.

Enjoy a flavour of both Scotland and England on St Cuthberts Way as you meander through the Scottish borders, into Northumberland and across the causeway to the charming island of Lindisfarne. Along the way you can visit ancient abbeys, castles and a cave, all with historic tales to tell. The Borders Abbeys Way links four of Britain’s most magnificent ruined medieval abbeys; Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso and Jedburgh. Enjoy gentle riverside paths following the Tweed and the Teviot and immerse yourself in the peace and tranquillity of the spacious Borders farmlands boasting flower filled meadows and a wealth of birdlife and wildlife.

On the east coast we have the Fife Coastal Path stretching from North Queensferry, just over the Firth of Forth from Edinburgh, right round to Newport-on-Tay, just this side of the bridge to Dundee on the Firth of Tay. Award winning beaches, nature reserves, old fishing harbours and historical buildings decorate this lovely stretch of coastline.

Whether you are looking for spectacular mountain landscapes, peaceful lochside views, a flavour of Scottish history, or a taste of salmon fishing and whisky distilleries, we can recommend a walking holiday in Scotland.

A gentle circuit of the spacious Scottish Borders countryside enjoying flower filled meadows and a wealth of birdlife and wildlife.

The Borders Abbeys Way links four of Britain’s most magnificent ruined medieval abbeys; Melrose, Dryburgh, Kelso and Jedburgh. The abbeys along with a host of historical sites paint a picture of the conflicts between the kingdoms of Scotland and England that raged throughout the Borderlands from the mid-12th to early 17th centuries.

Well waymarked and good under foot, the walking is a pleasure. The gradients are for the most part gentle, yet the views are at times breathtakingly beautiful. Riverside paths following the Tweed and the Teviot, old drove roads and disused railway lines along with forest tracks and open moorland combine to guide you on a spectacular 68 mile circuit of the Scottish Borders countryside that will delight even the most seasoned walker.

Founded in the first half of the 12th century on the command of King David I of Scotland the abbeys are testament to the supremacy and prosperity of medieval Anglo Norman monasticism. However, for four centuries the abbeys and the Borders folk fell victim to the lawlessness and violence that engulfed the region. Never more so than during Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century, when Scotland, led by Robert the Bruce emerged victorious with the re-establishment of an independent Scottish monarchy. The ruins that remain today are largely the result of military campaigns by the Earl of Hertford in 1544 and 1545 on behalf of King Henry VIII of England. Further destruction came from repeated vandalism by cross border militias known as Reivers and later Moss Troopers, during a period when the Borders was a perilous and lawless frontier.

Those days are past now and what remains is a place of peacefulness, a gentle countryside where historic towns and picturesque villages await you with a warm welcome. Nature lovers will rejoice in the Borders. The Tweed and the Teviot are home to salmon, trout and grayling. As you walk the river banks look for swans, tufted ducks and the great crested grebe. Nearby will be the grey wagtail and the sandmartin. Listen for the curlew, the skylark and from the hawthorn bushes, the song of the yellow hammer. In the meadows common spotted orchid can be found as well as mountain pansy, harebell, wood sorrel and primrose. Woodland gives cover to the redpoll, bullfinch and siskin while providing shelter for roe deer, badgers, fox and great spotted woodpeckers.

Length

5 - 8 nights

Full Route Length

68 miles / 109 km

Shortest Break Length

5 nights

Average Grade

Easy to Moderate

Why do this walk?

Marvel at four of Britain’s most magnificent ruined medieval abbeys.

Discover the story of the Border Reivers and Moss Troopers.

Delight in flower filled meadows and a wealth of birdlife and wildlife.

Explore the lands where King Robert the Bruce launched his raids into England.

Enjoy gentle riverside paths following the Tweed and the Teviot.

Visit Abbottsford House, the magnificent former residence of Sir Walter Scott.

Immerse yourself in the peace and tranquility of the spacious Borders farmlands.

Journey from the Firth of Forth around the East Neuk of Fife to the Firth of Tay.

The Fife Coastal Path is a journey of discovery. Designated by Scottish Natural Heritage as one of Scotland’s Great Trails the path is an absolute joy every step of the way as it stretches 81 miles from the Forth Estuary in the south, to the Tay Estuary in the north.

The path begins at North Queensferry with spectacular views of the estuary, the iconic Forth Bridges and the Edinburgh skyline. The walking is relatively straightforward, but the terrain is fascinating with evidence of lava flows and limestone strata containing marine fossils. Dysart Harbour and the Harbourmaster’s House are highlights as you make your way through the 7th century Royal Burgh. Cultural heritage, historic monuments, quaint villages, valued nature reserves, volcanic plugs and Fife’s only working fishing harbour are just some of the gems decorating the path as you continue to St Andrews and your journey’s end at Newport-on-Tay.

Clifftop walking, woodland, abandoned railway and of course gorgeous grassy paths through golden sand dunes, combine to deliver an incredible walking experience as you travel through the Kingdom of Fife. Always charming, at times challenging, the Fife Coastal Path and the warm Scottish welcome of its hosts, will remain long in the memory of the walker.

Length

4 - 7 nights

Full Route Length

81 miles / 130 km

Shortest Break Length

34 miles / 55km

Average Grade

Easy to Moderate

Why do this walk?

Delight in 15 Seaside Award beaches and a host of charming coves.

Marvel at rock formations, lava flows and fossil sites dating back to a time of active volcanoes and tropical swamps.

View stunning examples of architecture spanning eight centuries.

Enjoy the many nature or wildlife reserves and sites of special scientific interest boasting marshlands, calcareous dunes and botanically important coastal grasslands.

Spot grey seals and bottlenose dolphins, bats and red squirrels.

 

A gentler introduction to the highlands, coast to coast from Fort William to Inverness and along the Caledonian Canal and the shores of Loch Ness.

Walking Holidays in Scotland - Great Glen Way

The Great Glen Way runs 73 miles (117km) following the Great Glen, (or Glen Mor or Glen Albyn). From Fort William on the Atlantic west coast to Inverness on the North Sea.

From Loch Linnhe on the Atlantic coast the route follows canal towpaths, loch shore paths and forestry tracks to reach Inverness, capital of the Highlands. This is a relatively easy, low level route providing great views of the Lochs of the Great Glen and fine panoramas of the surrounding Highlands. With good waymarking, most of the walk is straightforward, along canal towpaths and forest tracks, with few challenging sections.

Length

6 - 8 nights

Full Route Length

73 miles / 117 km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

Walk from coast to coast through the Scottish highlands, on well made paths without too much ascent.

The Caledonian Canal provides an interesting backdrop and historical interest along much of the route.

Explore Loch Ness, by foot and boat.

Fine views of Ben Nevis, Britain's highest mountain.

Through the Trossachs and the Southern Highlands on drovers tracks, paths, and quiet lanes.

The Rob Roy Way encompasses many places strongly linked with Rob MacGregor, Scotland’s legendary outlaw from the latter parts of the 17th and early 18th centuries. In addition to its historic paths, railway heritage and glorious scenery, the Way is also rich in wildlife.

This walk starts from Drymen and travels through the southern highlands of Scotland, visiting stunning loch sides and hill country scenery along the way, finishing in Pitlochry.

Generally the Rob Roy Way is on good, quiet terrain with little exposure and can therefore be walked by most walkers. However this Way isn’t way marked and in places you will need to follow directions very carefully. The ability to navigate using both a map and a compass is essential in Scotland.

Length

6 - 9 nights

Full Route Length

79 miles / 126 km

Shortest Break Length

67 miles / 107 km

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

Walk in the quiet forests of the Trossachs and Perthshire.

Follow the route along numerous loch sides, with great views into the surrounding hills.

Visit picturesque Callandar and the renowned Victorian town of Pitlochry.

From the Moray coast walk through the heart of malt whisky country and into the foothills of the Cairngorms.

Telford's Bridge on the Speyside Way

The Speyside Way opened in 1981 and offers spectacular scenery in a region of Northeast Scotland famed for its Whisky Distilleries. It is a scenic walk along riverside tracks and through pinewoods, with plenty of opportunity to sample the local malt whiskies along the way.

Starting in Buckie on the Moray coast you will walk through the heart of malt whisky country and towards the foothills of the Cairngorms. Generally the way is straightforward, along paths and disused railway lines, through farmland, across hills and through splendid scenery of mixed woods, beside the river Spey.

Length

6 - 8 nights

Full Route Length

93 miles / 147 km

Shortest Break Length

65 miles / 104 km

Average Grade

Moderate to Challenging

Why do this walk?

A great riverside walk along one of Scotland longest rivers.

Relaxed easy walking (for Scotland!), and straightforward navigation.

Enjoy the peace and tranquillity of one of Scotland's quieter corners.

Pay a visit to one (or more) of the many distilleries in the malt whisky capital of the world.

Finish in Aviemore, at the heart of the Cairngorms National Park.

Through the quiet countryside of the Scottish Borders from Melrose to the Holy Island of Lindisfarne in England’s border county of Northumberland.

St Cutherbert's Cave on St Cuthbert's Way

St Cuthbert’s Way threads its way through the quiet countryside of the Scottish Borders and Northumberland, joining together places associated with the 7th Century Saint. It begins in the market town of Melrose in the Scottish Borders and finishes on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne on the edge of the North Sea. In-between it takes in some beautiful countryside, including the banks of the River Tweed and the foothills of the Cheviot Hills, and visits important historic sites such as Dryburgh Abbey and St Cuthbert’s Cave.

Starting in Melrose you will head through the Eildon Hills with great views of the surrounding countryside, before following the banks of the famous River Tweed. After a quick detour to the ruins of Dryburgh Abbey, you follow the course of Dere Street, an ancient Roman Road, before heading cross country to Kirk Yetholm, the end point of the Pennine way.

You will now head through the foothills of the remote and beautiful Cheviot Hills, and on to the sleepy market town of Wooler. As the coast draws near, you will visit St Cuthbert’s Cave before descending to the unique tidal causeway which leads to Holy Island with its spectacular priory and castle.

Length

5 - 8 nights

Full Route Length

63 miles / 101 km

Shortest Break Length

4 days / 5 nights

Average Grade

Moderate

Why do this walk?

A pleasant meander through the peaceful Scottish Border's countryside with lots of historical interest.

Take it easy and enjoy the quiet paths on this generally well waymarked route.

Crossing the tidal causeway to the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, with the dramatic setting of the castle and priory, makes a memorable end to the trip.

The classic Scottish long distance route from the edge of Glasgow along the shores of Loch Lomond and into the heart of the West Highlands, finishing at the foot of Ben Nevis, Britain’s highest mountain, at Fort William.

Scotland Walking Holidays - Rowardennan on the West Highland Way

The West Highland Way was the first long distance footpath to be established in Scotland. The route begins in Milngavie near Glasgow and after 95 miles of outstanding scenery, finishes in Fort William, at the foot of Ben Nevis, Britain’s highest mountain. The West Highland Way connects with the Great Glen Way, which Mickledore also offers to walkers, who want to walk all the way from Milngavie to Inverness.

The West Highland Way threads through Scotland’s history, following in the footsteps of drovers, pilgrims, soldiers, clansmen and cattle-rushers. Some of the walking is straightforward and some of it involves scrambling. It is important to note that some areas can be very exposed and must be taken seriously, as the weather in Scotland is very unpredictable.

Click here to read about our colleague Tara’s walk on The West Highland Way.

Length

4 - 10 nights

Full Route Length

95 miles / 152 km

Shortest Break Length

47 miles / 75 km

Average Grade

Moderate to Challenging

Why do this walk?

A tremendous route joining the Scottish lowlands with stunning Highland scenery.

Walk along the “Bonnie Banks” of Loch Lomond with great views of the mountains.

Cross the remote wilderness of Rannoch Moor, with its unique landscape.

Savour the excitement & achievement as you near Fort William, with Ben Nevis towering above.

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Hadrian’s Wall Walk, June 2021
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This Hadrian’s Wall walk has opened a new world to us. We enjoyed our holiday completely, no reservations about it. Thank you very much!

Hadrian’s Wall Walk, June 2021
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Everything went very smoothly and it really made the whole adventure more pleasurable knowing that Mickledore were taking care of all the bookings etc. We would definitely use the company again on our next trip.

Hadrian’s Wall Walk, June 2021
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